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August 13, 2010

Event: Valuing Lives: A Conference on Ethics in Health and the Environment

Valuing Lives: A Conference on Ethics in Health and the Environment
The NYU Center for Bioethics
New York University
March 5, 2011

The NYU Center for Bioethics in conjunction with the NYU Environmental Studies Program will be hosting ‘Valuing Lives: A Conference on Ethics in Health and the Environment’ on Saturday, March 5, 2011. The event will be held on New York University’s beautiful Washington Square campus, in the heart of Greenwich Village and will feature talks in a single day followed by an end-of-conference dinner at a local restaurant that night.

Call for Papers Deadline: November 1, 2010

For more information

August 12, 2010

Event: 4th National Conference on Genomics and Public Health

4th National Conference on Genomics and Public Health
Using Genomic Information to Improve Health Now and in the Future
Bethesda, Maryland
December 8-10, 2010

The 4th National Conference on Genomics and Public Health: Using Genomic Information to Improve Health Now and in the Future is a three-day event that will highlight best practices in public health genomics today while preparing for the future.

The agenda will feature keynote presentations by leaders in the fields of genomics and public health, interactive plenary and break-out sessions, and scientific poster exhibits on genomics research and public health practice. Networking events are also planned for the evenings.

For more information

New Issue of Biomedical Microdevices is Now Available

Biomedical Microdevices (Volume 12, Number 4, 2010) is now available by subscription only.

Articles Include:

  • “What We Know and Don’t Know About the Bioeffects of Nanoparticles: Developing Experimental Approaches for Safety Assessment” by Mel E. Stratmeyer, Peter L. Goering, Victoria M. Hitchins and Thomas H. Umbreit, 569-573.
  • “Nanotechnology for Regenerative Medicine” by Dongwoo Khang, Joseph Carpenter, Young Wook Chun, Rajesh Pareta and Thomas J. Webster, 589-596.
  • “Combinatorial Targeting and Nanotechnology Applications” by Glauco R. Souza, Fernanda I. Staquicini, Dawn R. Christianson, Michael G. Ozawa and J. Houston Miller, et al., 597-606.
  • Compressed Collagen Gel as the Scaffold for Skin Engineering” by Kuikui Hu, Hui Shi, Ji Zhu, Dan Deng and Guangdong Zhou, et al., 627-635.
  • Sustained Release of Insulin Through Skin by Intradermal Microdelivery System” by Yan Wu, Yunhua Gao, Guangjiong Qin, Suohui Zhang and Yuqin Qiu, et al., 665-671.
  • “Fabrication of Three-Dimensional Scaffolds for Heterogeneous Tissue Engineering” by Li-Hsin Han, Shalu Suri, Christine E. Schmidt and Shaochen Chen, 721-725.

New Issue of New England Journal of Medicine is Now Available

NEJM (Volume 363, Number 2, July 8, 2010) is now available by subscription only.

Articles Include:

  • “The SGR for Physician Payment – An Indispensable Abomination” by H.J. Aaron.
  • “Implementing Health Care Reform – Why Medicare Matters” by R.A. Berenson, 101-103.
  • “The Independent Payment Advisory Board” by T.S. Jost, 103-105.
  • “Identifying and Eliminating the Roadblocks to Comparative-Effectiveness Research” by D.F. Martin, M.G. Maguire, and S.L. Fine, 105-107.
  • “Limbal Stem-Cell Therapy and Long-Term Corneal Regeneration” by P. Rama and Others, 147-155.
  • “Genomic Medicine: Genomewide Association Studies and Assessment of the Risk of Disease” by T.A. Manollo, 166-176.
  • “Toward More Uniform Conflict Disclosures – The Updated ICMJE Conflict of Interest Reporting Form” by J.M. Drazen and Others, 188-189.
  • “Individual Genomes on the Horizon” by D. Watkins and C. Gallant, 195-196.

August 6, 2010

New Issue of Developing World Bioethics is Now Available

Developing World Bioethics (Volume 10, Issue 2, 2010) is now available by subscription only.

Articles Include:

  • “The Future of Bioethics” by Udo Schüklenk, ii-iii.
  • “Reproductive Tourism in Argentina: Clinic Accreditation and its Implications for Consumers, Health Professionals and Policy Makers” by Elsie Smith, Jason Behrmann, Carolina Martin, and Bryn Williams-Jones, 59-69.
  • “Curriculum Guide for Research Ethics Workshops for Countries in the Middle East” by Henry Silverman, Babiker Ahmed, Samar Ajeilet, Sumaia Al-Fadil, Suhail Al-Amad, Hadir El-Dessouky, Ibrahim El-Gendy, Mohamed El-Guindi, Mustafa El-Nimeiri, Rana Muzaffar, and Azza Saleh, 70-77.
  • “Access to Treatment in HIV Prevention Trials: Perspectives from a South African Community” by Nicola Barsdorf, Suzanne Maman, Nancy Kass, and Catherine Slack, 78-87.
  • “Training Needs Assessment in Research Ethics Evaluation Among Research Ethics Committee Members in Three African Countries: Cameroon, Mali, and Tanzania” by Jêrôme Ateudjieu, John Willians, Marie Hirtle, Cédric Baume, Joyce Ikingura, Alassane Niaré, and Dominique Sprumont, 88-98.
  • “From Medical Rationing to Rationalizing the Use of Human Resources for AIDS Care and Treatment in Africa: A Case for Task Shifting” by Jessica Price and Agnes Binagwaho, 99-103.
  • “You Can Use My Name; You Don’t Have to Steal My Story – A Critique of Anonymity in Indigenous Studies” by Anna-Lydia Svalastog and Stefan Eriksson, 104-110.

Book Reviews Include:

  • “Bioethics and Armed Conflict: Moral Dilemmas of Medicine and War – By Michael L. Gross” by Deanne-Peter Baker, 113.
  • “When Experiments Travel: Clinical Trials and the Global Search for Human Subjects – By Adriana Petryna” by Stuart Rennie, 114-115.

New Issue of New England Journal of Medicine is Now Available

NEJM (Volume 363, Number 3, July 15, 2010) is now available by subscription only.

Articles Include:

  • “Facing the Wild West of Health Care Reform – Donal Berwick, Pioneer” by J.K. Iglehart.
  • “Disclosing Industry Relationships – Toward an Improved Federal Research Policy” by E.G. Campbell and D.E. Zinner.
  • “The Renaissance in HIV Vaccine Development – Future Directions” by W.C. Koff and S.F. Berkley.
  • “The Havasupai Indian Tribe Case – Lessons for Research Involving Stored Biologic Samples” by M.M. Mello and L.E. Wolf, 204-207.
  • “Becoming a Physician: The Case for Primary Care – A Medical Student’s Perspective” by I. Ganguli, 207-209.
  • “Case 21-2010L A Request for Retrieval of Oocytes from a 36-Year-Old Woman with Anoxic Brain Injury” by D.M. Greer, A.K. Styer, T.L. Toth, C.P. Kindregan, and J.M. Romero, 27-283.
  • “Drug Management of Obesity – Efficacy versus Safety” by A. Astrup, 288-290.
  • “Trajectories of Disability in the Last Year of Life,” 294-295.
  • “Advance Directives and Surrogate Decision Making Before Death,” 295-296.

August 5, 2010

8th Annual Quandries in Health Care Conference

8TH Annual Quandaries in Health Care Conference
“A Need to Confess?: Writing About the Healthcare Experience

September 30 – October 2, 2010
The Given Institute of the University of Colorado
Aspen, Colorado

Quandaries in Health Care is an annual conference series in which keynote discussants, guest faculty and conference participants gather at the Given Institute in Aspen, Colorado, for two and one-half days of large and small group discussions revolving around a single theme.  This year’s theme explores the literary trend among healthcare professionals to publish narratives which reveal the pressures faced and felt by them, often by focusing upon breaches in expectations as well as the shame, guilt and anxiety that such breaches evoke.

The keynote discussants will examine the appropriateness and possible effects of such “confessional” writing, including the effects it may have on patients, the professions, and the connection between professionals and the communities they serve.

For more information or to register

New Issue of Archives of Internal Medicine is Now Available

Archives of Internal Medicine (Volume 170, Number 14, July 26, 2010) is now available by subscription only.

  • “Racial Differences in Admissions to High-Quality Hospitals for Coronary Heart Disease” by Ioana Popescu,  Brahmajee K. Nallamothu, Mary S. Vaughan-Sarrazin, and Peter Cram, 1209-1215.
  • “Geographic Variation in Carotid Revascularization Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 2003-2006″ by Manesh R. Patel, Melissa A. Greiner, Lisa D. DiMartino, Kevin A. Schulman, Pamela W. Duncan, David B. Matchar, and Lesley H. Curtis, 1218-1225.
  • “National Quality Forum Performance Measures for HIV/AIDS Care: The Department of Veterans Affairs’ Experience” by Lisa I. Backus, Derek B. Boothroyd, Barbara R. Phillips, Pamela S. Belperio, James P. Halloran, Ronald O. Valdiserri, and Larry A. Mole, 1239-1246.
  • “Receipt of High-Quality Coronary Heart Disease Care in the United States All About Being Black or White: Comment on ‘Racial Differences in Admissions to High-Quality Hospitals for Coronary Heart Disease’” by Michelle A. Albert 1216-1217.
  • “The Good, the Bad, and the About-to-Get Ugly: National Trends in Carotid Revascularization: Comment on ‘Geographic Variation in Carotid Revascularization Among Medicare Beneficiaries, 2003-2006″ by Ethan A. Halm, 1225-1227.
  • “Physicians’ and Nurses’ Experiences With Continuous Palliative Sedation in the Netherlands” by Siebe J. Swart, Tijn Brinkkemper, Judith A. C. Rietjens, Marco H. Blanker, Lia van Zuylen, Miel Ribbe, Wouter W. A. Zuurmond, Agnes van der Heide, and Roberto S. G. M. Perez, 1271-1274.
  • “Medical Decision Making at the Individual Patient Level” by Claudia Caroline Dobler and Guy Barrington Marks, 1275.
  • “Time Spent on Clinical Documentation: Is Technology a Help or a Hindrance?” by Jacob A. Doll and Vineet Arora, 1276.

New Issue of Journal of the American Medical Association is Now Available

JAMA (Volume 304, Number 4, July 28, 2010) is now available by subscription only.

Articles Include:

  • “Reducing Diagnostic Error Through Medical Home-Based Primary Care Reform” by Hardeep Singh and Mark Graber, 463-464.
  • “Medical Leadership in an Increasingly Complex World” by Robert H. Brook, 465-466.
  • “Miracles, Choices, and Justice: Tragedy of the Future Commons” by David B. Reuben, 467-468.
  • “Patient-Centered Care and Informed Consent” by James E. Gottesman, 409-410.
  • FDA Targets Antibiotic Use in Livestock” by Bridget M. Kuehn, 396.

July 26, 2010

Event: Neurosociety… What is it with the brain these days?

Neurosociety… What is it with the brain these days?
Institute for Science, Innovation and Society (InSIS), and the
European Neuroscience and Society Network (ENSN)
Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, UK.
7-8 December, 2010

The last twenty years have seen unprecedented advances in the neurosciences, in fields such as psychopharmacology, neurology and behavioural genetics. A growing number of ethicists, social scientists, legal scholars and philosophers have begun to analyze the social, legal and ethical implications of these advances, from the use of fMRI imaging in legal cases, to the medical benefits and risks of the increasing prescription of psychotropic drugs such as Prozac and Ritalin. Some attention has been paid to the economic questions raised by the commercial development and application of new technologies, and the extent to which subfields such as neuroeconomics and neuromarketing are generating commercially and clinically valuable findings. The conference aims to bring together academics and practitioners from this wide range of disciplines to attempt a critical evaluation of the current state and future prospects for neuro thinking.

For more information

Event: The Science in Society Conference 2010

Second International Conference on Science in Society
Carlos III University of Madrid
Madrid, Spain
11 to 13 November 2010

This Conference will address disciplinary and interdisciplinary challenges in the sciences, and in particular the relationships of science to society.

Key themes addressed by the Conference include the social impacts of science, the values and ethics of science, the pedagogies of science, the knowledge-making processes of science, the politics of science and the economics of science. At first glance, the scope and concerns of the Conference are enormous. However, in contrast to conferences with a specialist disciplinary focus, this Conference aims to explore, in an interdisciplinary spirit, linkages between different areas of concern and practices of investigation. We welcome presentation proposals which range from broad explorations of philosophical, theoretical, methodological and policy questions, to proposals which present finely grained evidence of the connections of science to society in microcosms of research, teaching and practice.

For more information

July 23, 2010

Event: 8th Annual Quandaries in Health Care Conference

8th Annual Quandaries in Health Care Conference
“A Need to Confess?: Writing About the Healthcare Experience

September 30 – October 2, 2010
The Given Institute of the University of Colorado
Aspen, Colorado

Quandaries in Health Care is an annual conference series in which keynote discussants, guest faculty and conference participants gather at the Given Institute in Aspen, Colorado, for two and one-half days of large and small group discussions revolving around a single theme.  This year’s theme explores the literary trend among healthcare professionals to publish narratives which reveal the pressures faced and felt by them, often by focusing upon breaches in expectations as well as the shame, guilt and anxiety that such breaches evoke.

The keynote discussants will examine the appropriateness and possible effects of such “confessional” writing, including the effects it may have on patients, the professions, and the connection between professionals and the communities they serve.

For more information

Event:19th International Cleveland Clinic Epilepsy Symposium

19th International Cleveland Clinic Epilepsy Symposium
Ethics of Invasive Brain Testing:  Limits and Responsibilities
Sunday October 3

Symposium Organizer – Paul Ford, PhD
Clinicians and researchers are faced with ethically intricate challenges with the continued advancement of invasive technologies for monitoring and testing brain functioning. These technologies allow us to localize seizure foci, map functional areas, and explore therapeutic stimulation with applications to epilepsy, tumors, neurodegenerative diseases, and psychiatric disorders. These tests are performed on patients who become unusually vulnerable to power differences and manipulation. We have great potential to manipulate a person’s cognition, mood, or mind through these processes. We need to have clear reasons and justifications for choosing:
* Which technologies we use
* Which patients we use them on
* How we use them on patients
* What research questions we tackle
* How we tackle those research projects
Threaded through these challenges are deeply held value convictions about justice, professionalism, and responsibility. Audience: This one-day symposium is intended to engage neurologists, neurosurgeons, psychiatrists, advance care nurses, physician assistants, and ethicists in addressing practical ethical challenges related to invasive brain testing.

For more information

Call for Applications for Research Ethics Workshop Scholarships

The Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics, University of Witwatersrand (WITS) will be running a 3 day training workshop on Research Ethics “Conducting Research Responsibly” between 3-5 October 2010. The workshop is funded by an unrestricted educational grant from PFIZER. The objective of the training program is to build research ethics capacity in Africa and is led by Prof A Dhai, Director of the Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics and Dr Norma Tsotsi, Director Undergraduate Programs at the Centre and is co-chaired by Professors Dhai and Joseph Mfutso-Bhengu, College of Medicine, Malawi.

Scholarships covering travel and accommodation will be provided for by the Steve Biko Centre for Bioethics from the educational grant. Research Ethics Committee members, research regulators and researchers who have not previously been exposed to research ethics training programs are invited to apply for scholarships. Applicants will need to be residing in Africa and are required to send through a motivation for funding, together with a brief CV. Applications and supporting documents should be emailed to both Professor A Dhai at amaboo.dhai@wits.ac.za  and Dr Norma Tsotsi at norma.tsotsi@wits.ac.za .

Workshop venue: Panari Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya

Closing date for applications: Friday, 20th August 2010

Queries: Professor Dhai at amaboo.dhai@wits.ac.za  or Dr Norma Tsotsi at
norma.tsotsi@wits.ac.za

July 22, 2010

Event: Reason, Theology, and the Genome

Reason, Theology, and the Genome: A Conference on the Ethics of Human Enhancement
Christ Church, University of Oxford
October 9, 2010

What is the place of theology in the growing debate over genetic engineering and human enhancement? Are theological reasons of interest only to believers? Or, as Michael Sandel and Jürgen Habermas have both suggested, might they be important for society generally, for secular and religious alike? Reason, Theology and the Genome brings together a distinguished international panel of speakers, representing many different disciplines and points of view, to consider the relevance of theology to one of the most important questions of our time.

For more information or to register

Event: Humanities and Technology Association Annual Conference

Humanities and Technology Association Annual Conference
September 30-October 2, 2010
Bowie State University
14000 Jericho Road Park
Bowie, Maryland

This year our special topic is: Technology and Development: The Human Benefits and Burdens.  The sustainable use of technical and natural resources makes it possible to alleviate world hunger, eliminate literacy, deliver basic health care services, and raise living standards worldwide.  Yet, we still face significant political, economic, environmental, and social challenges in reaching the United Nations Millennium Development Goals of eliminating extreme poverty in all its forms by 2015.  Some of these challenges evoke questions about the use and abuse of technologies with regard to development.  What have been the human benefits and burdens of the introduction of new technologies in the past and what are the challenges facing both the developed and developing countries today?

For more information or to register

July 8, 2010

Event: Second International Congress Of Bioethics

Second International Congress Of Bioethics
“Morality, Spirituality and Creationism”
20-22 November, 2010

Location (venue details & address): National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (NIGEB), Shahrak-e Pajoohesh, km 15, Tehran – Karaj Highway,Tehran, Iran

Contact tel: +98 21 44580472

Contact email: info@iranbioethics2010.ir,

Abstract submission deadline: 22 September 2010

For more information, please visit: http://iranbioethics2010.ir/

New Issue of Cell Stem Cell is Now Available

Cell Stem Cell (Volume 7, Issue 1, July 2, 2010) is now available by subscription only.

Articles Include:

  • “Patient-Specific Pluripotent Stem Cells Become Even More Accessible” by Shinya Yamanaka, 1.
  • “Tumor Oncogenotypes and Lung Cancer Stem Cell Identity” by James P. Sullivan and John D. Minna, 2.
  • “When Fibroblasts MET iPSCs” by Jose M. Polo and Konrad Hochedlinger, 5.
  • “Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Human Terminally Differentiated Circulating T Cells” by Tomohisa Seki, Shinsuke Yuasa, Mayumi Oda, Toru Egashira, Kojiro Yae, Dai Kusumoto, Hikari Nakata, Shugo Tohyama, Hisayuki Hashimoto, Masaki Kodaira, Yohei Okada, Hiroyuki Seimiya, Noemi Fusaki, Mamoru Hasegawa, and Keiichi Fukuda, 11.
  • “Reprogramming of T Cells from Human Peripheral Blood” by Yuin-Han Loh, Odelya Hartung, Hu Li, Chunguang Guo, Julie M. Sahalie, Philip D. Manos, Achia Urbach, Garrett C. Heffner, Marica Grskovic, Francois Vigneault, M. William Lensch, In-Hyun Park, Suneet Agarwal, George M. Church, James J. Collins, Stefan Irion, and George Q. Daley, 15.
  • “Reprogramming of Human Peripheral Blood Cells to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells” by Judith Staerk, Meelad M. Dawlaty, Qing Gao, Dorothea Maetzel, Jacob Hanna, Cesar A. Sommer, Gustavo Mostoslavsky, and Rudolf Jaenisch, 20.
  • “Commercialization and Collaboration: Competing Policies in Publicly Funded Stem Cell Research?by Tania Bubela, Andreas Strotmann, Rhiannon Adams, Shawn Morrison, 25.
  • “Patients Beware: Commercialized Stem Cell Treatments on the Web” by Patrick L. Taylor, Roger A. Barker, Karl G. Blume, Elena Cattaneo, Alan Colman, Hongkui Deng, Harold Edgar, Ira J. Fox, Claude Gerstle, Lawrence S.B. Goldstein, Katherine A. High, Andrew Lyall, Robertson Parkman, Fernando J. Pitossi, Ernest D. Prentice, Heather M. Rooke, Douglas A. Sipp, Alok Srivastava, Susan Stayn, Gary K. Steinberg, Amy J. Wagers, and Irving L. Weissman, 43.

July 2, 2010

Accounting for Health and Health Care: Approaches to Measuring the Sources and Costs of Their Improvement is Now Available

Accounting for Health and Health Care: Approaches to Measuring the Sources and Costs of Their Improvement by the Panel to Advance a Research Program on the Design of National Health Accounts and the National Research Council (The National Academies Press)

It has become trite to observe that increases in health care costs have become unsustainable. How best for policy to address these increases, however, depends in part on the degree to which they represent increases in the real quantity of medical services as opposed to increased unit prices of existing services. And an even more fundamental question is the degree to which the increased spending actually has purchased improved health.

Accounting for Health and Health Care addresses both these issues. The government agencies responsible for measuring unit prices for medical services have taken steps in recent years that have greatly improved the accuracy of those measures. Nonetheless, this book has several recommendations aimed at further improving the price indices.

New Issue of Journal of Academic Ethics is Now Available

Journal of Academic Ethics (Volume 7, Number 4, 2009) is now available by subscription only.

Articles Include:

  • “Patients as Teaching Tools: Merely Informed or True Consent” by Syed Mamun Mahmud and Aasim Ahmad, 255-260.
  • “The New Biopolitics” by Jiangxia Yu and Jingwei Liu, 287-296.

Event: Human Dignity and the Future of Health Care

The Institute for Faith and Learning
Baylor University
2010 Baylor Symposium on Faith and Culture
“Human Dignity and the Future of Health Care”
October 28-30, 2010
Waco, Texas

Inspired by the conviction that a Christian understanding of the dignity of the human person should inform fundamental questions about the future of health care, our conference seeks to engage participants from a broad range of disciplines and health care professions.  Confirmed speakers include: Elias Bongmba, Rice University; Toyin Falola, University of Texas; Paul Griffiths, Duke Divinity School; Jeff Levin, Baylor University; Gilbert Meilaender, Valparaiso University; Stephen Post, Stony Brook University; Margaret Somerville, McGill University; Daniel Sulmasy, University of Chicago; John Swinton, University of Aberdeen; and S. Kay Toombs, Baylor University.

For more information, please visit: http://www.baylor.edu/ifl/index.php?id=70580.

Call for Papers Deadline: July 15, 2010

 

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